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By: Kim Metz,  RYT 500 hour, MS Yoga Therapy

As some of you know my husband and I are now officially  “empty nesters.” Both of our kids are in college, living away from home for the first time.

To mark this threshold in our lives we’ve been organizing our home, and while cleaning out closets I came across my button collection (see picture below) from when I was a kid. It reminds me of other items I liked to collect when I was younger like glass animal figurines, and all things cats!

It got me thinking about why we collect things and how collecting things may cultivate the core elements of mindfulness: intention, attention, and attitude.

Sometimes being mindful is difficult. It can seem like we are doing the same thing day after day. Seeing ourselves as collectors of moments is an interesting, beneficial way of approaching mindfulness and gives us the opportunity to see things anew both in our yoga practice and in our lives.

  • Intention- When we start our day with the canvas of 16 hours of fresh space ahead of us it gives us a medium for our intention. We need to have a path or something to collect or we will miss the moments. If you are looking for four leaf clovers you are much more likely to find one; if not you may even miss the patches of three leaf clovers under your feet! …So collecting something naturally gives us a direction.
  • Attention- What we turn our attention toward is what we become. We have the opportunity to collect moments that we care about and that hold meaning for us.
  • Attitude- In mindfulness practice, it is important to have an open, curious, non-judging attitude. When we are collectors of things we are naturally more open and curious about what treasures we may find.

Try it for yourself!

Wake up in the morning and remind yourself you are a collector of moments. – an artist with the whole day’s canvas ahead of you. When you receive a moment like a beautiful sunset, or an ant crawling across the ground,  pause, and notice how it feels in your body. Breathe it in. Acknowledge this moment you have collected.

Try writing about it. Include sensory details about what the moment looks like and sounds like. Write about the sensations you feel in your body. You could even place your written moments in a jar.

As we move toward cooler shorter days of fall and winter, may you collect moments that nourish you and bring you ease, warmth, meaning, and joy.

See you on the mat!  Namaste.

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